Status-Quo-report on organic waste treatment in East Africa published

23. August 2022

Status-Quo-report on organic waste treatment in East Africa published

The first report from the pilot project “Guideline for organic waste treatment in East Africa” by the PREVENT Waste Alliance is now publicly available. The status-quo report poses a legal, technical and economic guideline for dealing with organic waste as a basic strategy for politics, administration, research and the private sector for East African countries using the example of Ethiopia.

Organic waste is posing an environmental and public health issue for East Africa. The currently generated quantities are estimated to be around 41 million metric tons, with an estimated growth trend of 199% in the next 30 years if a business-as-usual approach is maintained. These quantities are currently very poorly managed: the solid waste management system in East Africa is characterised by a low rate of collection, inadequate transport systems and unsafe final disposal. If the system does not improve substantially in the near future, the ability to cope with the problem is at serious risk. However, the current situation can be seen as an opportunity to organise sustainable waste management system based on the perception of organic waste as a resource that can be converted into valuable products, such us biogas, compost or solid fuel.

The first report from the pilot project “Guideline for organic waste treatment in East Africa” by the PREVENT Waste Alliance is now publicly available. The status-quo report is meant to serve as a legal, technical and economic guideline for dealing with organic waste as a basic strategy for politics, administration, research and the private sector for East African countries using the example of Ethiopia.

For this purpose, the present publication gives a general overview of the current state of organic waste management in East African countries, specifically using Ethiopia as an example. Besides presenting the generated amounts and the composition of solid waste in East Africa, the current legal frameworks are laid out as well as the current state of organic waste treatment. Furthermore, besides taking a closer look on three case studies in Ethiopia (Addis Ababa, Hawassa and Gidole), a list of current and recent projects on solid waste management in Eastern Africa is presented.

The report is available free of charge at https://www.dbfz.de/report-45

In a further step, technical solutions will be developed and proposed, based on the knowledge compiled here. These technical solutions will be published in a subsequent report shortly.